Digital Media and Library Instruction

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$43.00
ALA Member: 
$ 38.70
Item Number: 
978-0-8389-1818-0
Published: 
2019
Publisher: 
ALA TechSource
Pages: 
28
Width: 
8 12"
Height: 
11"
Format: 
Softcover
  • Description
  • Table of Contents
  • About the Authors

Professionals in the field of librarianship are creative when it comes to the delivery of information and instruction. If face-to-face options aren’t available, librarians look to digital means, and there are so many options out there—from podcasting, blogging, and edutubing. In this issue of Library Technology Reports (vol. 55, no. 5), the authors explore how these forms of digital media and others can help enhance information dissemination and library instruction. This report covers

  • the process of creating a podcast, from content creation to the technical requirements, and why podcasting may be right for your library;
  • flipped learning environments, the reasons why instructors should flip, and assessment activities;
  • how to maintain a YouTube channel with an educational lens; and
  • how blogging can be used as an effective and relevant educational tool.

Chapter 1—Introduction
Heather Moorefield-Lang

Chapter 2—Library-Podcast Intersections
Steve Thomas

Chapter 3—Flipped Learning Environments: An Introduction for Librarians Who Design and Teach
Lucy Santos Green

Chapter 4—Taking Your Library Instruction to YouTube
Heather Moorefield-Lang

Chapter 5—A Librarian’s Journey in Blogging
Lucas Maxwell

Chapter 6—Conclusion
Heather Moorefield-Lang

Heather Moorefield-Lang

Heather Moorefield-Lang is a former middle school theater teacher and school librarian. She currently serves as an associate professor with the University of South Carolina in the School of Library and Information Science. Heather has long been interested in how technologies can further enhance instruction in libraries and classrooms. Her current research focuses on makerspaces in libraries of all types and levels. She has had the honor of being nominated for the White House Champion of Change for Making in 2016 and was a finalist for 2017’s American Association of School Librarians Social Media Superstars in the area of Tech Troubadours. To learn more about Heather and her work, see her website www.techfifteen.com, check out her YouTube Channel Tech 15, or follow her on Twitter @actinginthelib.

Library Technology Reports

Published by ALA TechSource, Library Technology Reports helps librarians make informed decisions about technology products and projects. Library Technology Reports publishes eight issues annually and provides thorough overviews of current technology. Reports are authored by experts in the field and may address the application of technology to library services, offer evaluative descriptions of specific products or product classes, or cover emerging technology. Find out more information on this publication and how you can subscribe here.

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