Interacting with History: Teaching with Primary Sources

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$45.00
ALA Member: 
$ 40.50
Item Number: 
978-0-8389-1205-8
Published: 
2014
Publisher: 
ALA Editions
Pages: 
136
Width: 
8 12"
Height: 
11"
Format: 
Softcover
AP Categories: 
A, C, E, G, I

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  • Description
  • Table of Contents
  • About the Author
  • Reviews

With nearly 142 million items and one of the largest bodies of high-quality, digitized content available, the Library of Congress (LOC) is an enormously useful resource for librarians and teachers. Yet it remains a mystery to many. Exploring the wealth of materials freely available for free from LOC, Lehman and a stellar roundup of contributors offer an up-to-date survey of teacher resources to help teachers and librarian educators shake the dust off state-mandated history and literature curricula. Beginning with an introduction by Barbara Stripling, 2013-14 ALA President, this book

  • Presents a tour of LOC, with an overview of its primary sources, including digital resources such as maps, diaries, and songbooks
  • Details LOC Teacher Page resources, which provide easy access to the most relevant primary sources from the collections
  • Offers a selection of lessons from teacher-librarians across the county, with guidance on how librarians and teachers and can use the library's resources in their local communities
  • Features numerous sidebars, tables, and illustrations, showing how LOC's resources can illuminate the past while also providing a backdrop for discussing contemporary issues

This book persuasively demonstrates how the online resources of the Library of Congress can be used not only to enhance a sense of history but also to teach information literacy, online searching, and critical thinking skills to elementary, middle, and high school students.

Acknowledgments
Introduction 
by Barbara Stripling
Chapter 1
Welcome to the Library of Congress
Sharon Metzger-Galloway
Chapter 2
Teaching Resources from the Library of Congress
Sara Suiter
Chapter 3
Professional Development and Support for Classroom Teachers Available through the Library of Congress
Katharine Lehman
Chapter 4
Action Lessons: Interacting with History 
Compiled by Katharine Lehman from Participants of the 2011 Library of Congress Summer Institute
Chapter 5
Discovering Local History Resources in Your Own Backyard
Mary Alice Anderson
About the Author and Contributors
Index

Katharine Lehman

Katharine Lehman is a National Board–certified school librarian at Thomas Dale High School in Chester, Virginia, where she was Teacher of the Year in 2009. She received her MSLS from Southern Connecticut State University. She has taught adjunct classes in library science at Old Dominion University and Longwood University. She is past president of the Virginia Educational Media Association. Her publications include articles in Knowledge Quest, Teacher Librarian, and Library Media Collection. She coauthored Power Researchers: Transforming Student Library Aides into Action Learners (Libraries Unlimited, 2011), a curriculum guide, with Lori Donovan. She has served on the Library of Congress Professional Review Committee for the TPS Direct program (Teaching with Primary Sources) since its inception. She attended the Library of Congress Summer Institute in 2011.

"This book is essential for K-12 educators and would be best in a school library that contains professional development material and any academic library in a school with an education department."
— Catholic Library World

"Chock-full of concrete activities, hints, tips, and other advice for K-12 teachers who wish to expose their students to primary sources … The ‘action lessons' compiled by Lehman in chapter 4 from participants in the 2011 Library of Congress Summer Institute should not be missed. I found the teachers' experiences inspirational and picked up several tips in working with primary sources for my own teaching."
— Portal

"Provides a great overview of the Library of Congress's resources for K-12 educators and can give archivists and librarians tips for best practices in engaging and working with this community on use of local primary sources."
— Journal for the Society of North Carolina Archivists