The Librarian's Guide to Genealogical Services and Research:

$93.00
ALA Member: 
$ 83.70
Item Number: 
978-1-55570-491-9
Publisher: 
ALA Neal-Schuman
Pages: 
225
Width: 
8 12"
Height: 
11"
  • Description
  • Table of Contents

For the patron who can trace their lineage back to the Mayflower or the student trying to find the beginnings of a family tree, family history is an individualized and often specialized strand of research. Now James Swan, a librarian and genealogist with forty years of experience, makes any librarian an expert in genealogy. This title details the process and describes where to find and how to use all the documents involved--censuses, birth, marriage and death Certificates, and many often-overlooked personal papers. Swan describes methods for improving library service to patrons, including building collections, acquiring and preserving local data, identifying and accessing remote resources, and more. An entire section is devoted to a step-by-step guide for constructing a genealogy, which can be used by librarians, archivists, family history workers or interested amateurs. A checklist of key indexes and databases ensures thorough research. Sections for technology link users to the genealogical resources on the Web. A companion CD provides hyperlinks for all the recommended Web sites and 25 printable charts, lists, and forms (including a Checklist for Genealogical Research 1850-1900, a Research Log, and a Federal Census Chronology). This unique approach will make librarians the first resource for any genealogical search.

For the patron who can trace their lineage back to the Mayflower or the student trying to find the beginnings of a family tree, family history is an individualized and often specialized strand of research. Now James Swan, a librarian and genealogist with forty years of experience, makes any librarian an expert in genealogy. This title details the process and describes where to find and how to use all the documents involved--censuses, birth, marriage and death Certificates, and many often-overlooked personal papers. Swan describes methods for improving library service to patrons, including building collections, acquiring and preserving local data, identifying and accessing remote resources, and more. An entire section is devoted to a step-by-step guide for constructing a genealogy, which can be used by librarians, archivists, family history workers or interested amateurs. A checklist of key indexes and databases ensures thorough research. Sections for technology link users to the genealogical resources on the Web. A companion CD provides hyperlinks for all the recommended Web sites and 25 printable charts, lists, and forms (including a Checklist for Genealogical Research 1850-1900, a Research Log, and a Federal Census Chronology). This unique approach will make librarians the first resource for any genealogical search.