Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians—print/e-book Bundle

This specially priced bundle includes a print copy for desk reference along with the e-book version. The download link for this product can be found on the final confirmation screen after you complete your purchase, and may also be accessed from your Account Profile; the print copy will be shipped to you. For more information about ALA eEditions file types and how to view them on eReaders, desktop computers, and other devices, see this page.

Find on LibraryThing.Find on WorldCat.
$50.00
ALA Member: 
$ 45.00
Item Number: 
8700-7759
Published: 
2015
Publisher: 
ACRL
Pages: 
140
Format: 
eBook
  • Description
  • Table of Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Reviews

Acknowledgements

Classroom Assessment for Librarians: An Introduction

  • Assessment of Learning
  • Classroom Assessment Defined
  • Need for Classroom Assessment in the Library
  • Learning Outcomes and Classroom Assessment
  • The Assessment Cycle
  • Getting Started with Classroom Assessment Techniques
    • Plan
    • Do It!
    • Respond
  • Analyzing the Information Collected through CATs
  • Tips    
  • How to Use This Book
  • Notes

Chapter 1: Assessing Prior Knowledge and Understanding

  • Why Assess Prior Knowledge and Understanding?
  • Background Knowledge Check
    • When to Use a Background Knowledge Check
    • Variations
    • Example in the First-Year Experience
    • Example with an Online Education Graduate Course
    • Example from a Workshop on Finding Data and Statistical Sources
    • How to Score a Background Knowledge Check
    • What to Do with Results
  • Preconception Check
    • When to Use a Preconception Check
    • Example about the Value of Information
    • Example about the Information Cycle
    • Example about the Way Information Sources Are Organized
    • How to Score a Preconception Check
    • What to Do with Results
  • Focused Listing
    • When to Use Focused Listing
    • Example for Faceted Search
    • Example for Scholarly Articles
    • Example for Evaluating a Source for Use
    • How to Score Focused Listing
    • What to Do with Results
  • Minute Paper
    • When to Use a Minute Paper
    • Variations
    • Example for Advanced Nursing Students
    • Example from Finding Full-Text Results
    • Example from a Multi-day Workshop
    • How to Score a Minute Paper
    • What to Do with Results
  • The Muddiest Point
    • When to Use the Muddiest Point
    • Variations
    • Example in a History Class
    • Example with an Online Family and Consumer Sciences Class
    • Example from a Credit-Bearing Library Class
    • How to Score the Muddiest Point
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Chapter 2: Assessing Skill in Analysis and Critical Thinking

  • Why Assess Analytical Skills and Critical Thinking?
  • Categorizing Grid
    • When to Use a Categorizing Grid
    • Variations
    • Example for a First-Year Seminar Class
    • Example for an Online Class
    • Example for Choosing a Database
    • How to Score a Categorizing Grid
    • What to Do with Results
  • Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • When to Use a Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • Example from an Introduction to Research Class Session
    • Example from a One-Shot Library Session for First-Year Students
    • Example from a Film and Literature Class
    • How to Score a Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • What to Do with Results
  • Pro and Con Grid
    • When to Use a Pro and Con Grid
    • Variations
    • Example in a One-Shot Library Research Session
    • Example from a Semester-long Information Literacy Course
    • Example from a Professional Program with an Embedded Librarian
    • How to Score a Pro and Con Grid
    • What to Do with Results
  • Think-Pair-Share
    • When to Use Think-Pair-Share
    • Variations
    • Example in a Graduate Educational Studies Course
    • Example in a Freshman Composition Course
    • Example in an Undergraduate Business Course
    • How to Score Think-Pair-Share
    • What to Do with Results
  • Defining Features Matrix
    • When to Use a Defining Features Matrix
    • Variations
    • Example with Acceptable Sources for a Research Paper
    • Example with Primary and Secondary Sources in a History Class
    • Example Comparing Various Citation Management Tools in a Workshop
    • How to Score a Defining Features Matrix
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Chapter 3: Assessing Skill in Synthesis and Creative Thinking

  • Why Assess Skill in Synthesis and Creative Thinking?
  • One-Sentence Summary
    • When to Use a One-Sentence Summary
    • Sample One-Sentence Summary
    • Example on "Authority Is Constructed and Contextual"
    • Example on "Information Creation as a Process"
    • Example on "Information Has Value"
    • Example on "Research as Inquiry"
    • Example on "Scholarship Is a Conversation"
    • Example on "Searching Is Strategic"
    • How to Score a One-Sentence Summary
    • What to Do with Results
  • Concept Maps
    • When to Use a Concept Map
    • Example for First-Year Experience Library Research Course
    • Example for First-Year Writing Course
    • Example for an Upper-Division Course
    • Variation
    • How to Score a Concept Map
    • What to Do with Results
  • Invented Dialogues
    • When to Use Invented Dialogues
    • Example on Popular versus Scholarly Articles
    • Example on Authority as Contextual and Constructed
    • Example on Evaluating a Source for Relevance and Utility
    • How to Score an Invented Dialogue
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 4: Assessing Skill in Application

  • Why Assess Skill in Application?
  • Directed Paraphrasing
    • When to Use Directed Paraphrasing
    • Example in the First-Year Experience
    • Examples in a Research-Intensive Undergraduate Course
    • Example from a Literature Course
    • Example from a Workshop for Teaching Librarians
    • How to Score Directed Paraphrasing
    • What to Do with Results
  • Transfer and Apply
    • When to Use Transfer and Apply
    • Example When Embedded in an Online Course
    • Example from a Workshop on Citation Management Systems
    • Example from a First-Year Composition Course
    • How to Score Transfer and Apply
    • What to Do with Results
  • 3-2-1
    • When to Use 3-2-1
    • Variations
    • Example from a Freshman Composition Instruction Session
    • Example from a Class Field Trip to the Archives
    • Example after a Library Tutorial
    • How to Score 3-2-1
    • What to Do with Results
  • Class Modeling
    • When to Use Class Modeling
    • Example with Boolean Operators
    • Example with Information-Seeking Behaviors
    • Example Using a Bloom Ball
    • How to Score Class Modeling
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 5: Assessing Attitudes and Self-Awareness

  • Why Assess Attitudes and Self-Awareness?
  • Opinion Polls
    • When to Use an Opinion Poll
    • Example in a First-Year Political Science Course
    • Example in an Online Course
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Research Course
    • How to Score Opinion Polls
    • What to Do with Results
  • Self-Confidence Surveys
    • When to Use a Self-Confidence Survey
    • Example from a First-Year Engineering Class
    • Example from an Online Class
    • Example from a One-Shot Instruction Class
    • How to Score a Self-Confidence Survey
    • What to Do with Results
  • Goal Ranking and Matching
    • When to Use Goal Ranking and Matching
    • Example for a Workshop
    • Example in an Online Course
    • How to Score Goal Ranking and Matching
    • What to Do with Results
  • Research Logs
    • When to Use Research Logs
    • Example from a Credit-Bearing Course
    • Example from an Online Course with an Embedded Librarian
    • Example from a One-Shot Workshop with Senior-Level Students in Literature
    • How to Score a Research Log
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 6: Assessing Learner Reactions

  • Why Assess Learning Reactions?
  • Chain Notes
    • When to Use Chain Notes
    • How to Use Chain Notes
    • Example in a Large Lecture Class
    • Example in a Hands-on Computer Classroom
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Course
    • How to Score Chain Notes
    • What to Do with Results
  • Classroom Assessment Quality Circles
    • When to Use Classroom Assessment Quality Circles
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Course
    • Example for a Library Instruction Program
    • What to Do with Results
  • RSQC2: Recall, Summarize, Question, Connect, and Comment
    • When to Use RSQC2
    • Example RSQC2 for a Library Instruction Program
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Course
    • How to Score RSQC2
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Conclusion

  • Transparency
  • Collaboration
  • Evidence-Based Practice


Appendices

Appendix 1: Learning Outcomes

  • What Is a Learning Outcome?
  • Why Use Learning Outcomes?
  • How to Write a Learning Outcome
  • Notes

Appendix 2: Rubrics

  • What Is a Rubric?
  • Why Use Rubrics?
  • How to Create a Rubric
  • Notes
  • Suggested Reading
  • Assessment
  • Instructional Design
  • Library Instruction
  • Learning Theory
  • Standards

Acknowledgements

Classroom Assessment for Librarians: An Introduction

  • Assessment of Learning
  • Classroom Assessment Defined
  • Need for Classroom Assessment in the Library
  • Learning Outcomes and Classroom Assessment
  • The Assessment Cycle
  • Getting Started with Classroom Assessment Techniques
    • Plan
    • Do It!
    • Respond
  • Analyzing the Information Collected through CATs
  • Tips    
  • How to Use This Book
  • Notes

Chapter 1: Assessing Prior Knowledge and Understanding

  • Why Assess Prior Knowledge and Understanding?
  • Background Knowledge Check
    • When to Use a Background Knowledge Check
    • Variations
    • Example in the First-Year Experience
    • Example with an Online Education Graduate Course
    • Example from a Workshop on Finding Data and Statistical Sources
    • How to Score a Background Knowledge Check
    • What to Do with Results
  • Preconception Check
    • When to Use a Preconception Check
    • Example about the Value of Information
    • Example about the Information Cycle
    • Example about the Way Information Sources Are Organized
    • How to Score a Preconception Check
    • What to Do with Results
  • Focused Listing
    • When to Use Focused Listing
    • Example for Faceted Search
    • Example for Scholarly Articles
    • Example for Evaluating a Source for Use
    • How to Score Focused Listing
    • What to Do with Results
  • Minute Paper
    • When to Use a Minute Paper
    • Variations
    • Example for Advanced Nursing Students
    • Example from Finding Full-Text Results
    • Example from a Multi-day Workshop
    • How to Score a Minute Paper
    • What to Do with Results
  • The Muddiest Point
    • When to Use the Muddiest Point
    • Variations
    • Example in a History Class
    • Example with an Online Family and Consumer Sciences Class
    • Example from a Credit-Bearing Library Class
    • How to Score the Muddiest Point
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Chapter 2: Assessing Skill in Analysis and Critical Thinking

  • Why Assess Analytical Skills and Critical Thinking?
  • Categorizing Grid
    • When to Use a Categorizing Grid
    • Variations
    • Example for a First-Year Seminar Class
    • Example for an Online Class
    • Example for Choosing a Database
    • How to Score a Categorizing Grid
    • What to Do with Results
  • Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • When to Use a Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • Example from an Introduction to Research Class Session
    • Example from a One-Shot Library Session for First-Year Students
    • Example from a Film and Literature Class
    • How to Score a Content, Form, and Function Outline
    • What to Do with Results
  • Pro and Con Grid
    • When to Use a Pro and Con Grid
    • Variations
    • Example in a One-Shot Library Research Session
    • Example from a Semester-long Information Literacy Course
    • Example from a Professional Program with an Embedded Librarian
    • How to Score a Pro and Con Grid
    • What to Do with Results
  • Think-Pair-Share
    • When to Use Think-Pair-Share
    • Variations
    • Example in a Graduate Educational Studies Course
    • Example in a Freshman Composition Course
    • Example in an Undergraduate Business Course
    • How to Score Think-Pair-Share
    • What to Do with Results
  • Defining Features Matrix
    • When to Use a Defining Features Matrix
    • Variations
    • Example with Acceptable Sources for a Research Paper
    • Example with Primary and Secondary Sources in a History Class
    • Example Comparing Various Citation Management Tools in a Workshop
    • How to Score a Defining Features Matrix
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Chapter 3: Assessing Skill in Synthesis and Creative Thinking

  • Why Assess Skill in Synthesis and Creative Thinking?
  • One-Sentence Summary
    • When to Use a One-Sentence Summary
    • Sample One-Sentence Summary
    • Example on "Authority Is Constructed and Contextual"
    • Example on "Information Creation as a Process"
    • Example on "Information Has Value"
    • Example on "Research as Inquiry"
    • Example on "Scholarship Is a Conversation"
    • Example on "Searching Is Strategic"
    • How to Score a One-Sentence Summary
    • What to Do with Results
  • Concept Maps
    • When to Use a Concept Map
    • Example for First-Year Experience Library Research Course
    • Example for First-Year Writing Course
    • Example for an Upper-Division Course
    • Variation
    • How to Score a Concept Map
    • What to Do with Results
  • Invented Dialogues
    • When to Use Invented Dialogues
    • Example on Popular versus Scholarly Articles
    • Example on Authority as Contextual and Constructed
    • Example on Evaluating a Source for Relevance and Utility
    • How to Score an Invented Dialogue
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 4: Assessing Skill in Application

  • Why Assess Skill in Application?
  • Directed Paraphrasing
    • When to Use Directed Paraphrasing
    • Example in the First-Year Experience
    • Examples in a Research-Intensive Undergraduate Course
    • Example from a Literature Course
    • Example from a Workshop for Teaching Librarians
    • How to Score Directed Paraphrasing
    • What to Do with Results
  • Transfer and Apply
    • When to Use Transfer and Apply
    • Example When Embedded in an Online Course
    • Example from a Workshop on Citation Management Systems
    • Example from a First-Year Composition Course
    • How to Score Transfer and Apply
    • What to Do with Results
  • 3-2-1
    • When to Use 3-2-1
    • Variations
    • Example from a Freshman Composition Instruction Session
    • Example from a Class Field Trip to the Archives
    • Example after a Library Tutorial
    • How to Score 3-2-1
    • What to Do with Results
  • Class Modeling
    • When to Use Class Modeling
    • Example with Boolean Operators
    • Example with Information-Seeking Behaviors
    • Example Using a Bloom Ball
    • How to Score Class Modeling
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 5: Assessing Attitudes and Self-Awareness

  • Why Assess Attitudes and Self-Awareness?
  • Opinion Polls
    • When to Use an Opinion Poll
    • Example in a First-Year Political Science Course
    • Example in an Online Course
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Research Course
    • How to Score Opinion Polls
    • What to Do with Results
  • Self-Confidence Surveys
    • When to Use a Self-Confidence Survey
    • Example from a First-Year Engineering Class
    • Example from an Online Class
    • Example from a One-Shot Instruction Class
    • How to Score a Self-Confidence Survey
    • What to Do with Results
  • Goal Ranking and Matching
    • When to Use Goal Ranking and Matching
    • Example for a Workshop
    • Example in an Online Course
    • How to Score Goal Ranking and Matching
    • What to Do with Results
  • Research Logs
    • When to Use Research Logs
    • Example from a Credit-Bearing Course
    • Example from an Online Course with an Embedded Librarian
    • Example from a One-Shot Workshop with Senior-Level Students in Literature
    • How to Score a Research Log
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes


Chapter 6: Assessing Learner Reactions

  • Why Assess Learning Reactions?
  • Chain Notes
    • When to Use Chain Notes
    • How to Use Chain Notes
    • Example in a Large Lecture Class
    • Example in a Hands-on Computer Classroom
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Course
    • How to Score Chain Notes
    • What to Do with Results
  • Classroom Assessment Quality Circles
    • When to Use Classroom Assessment Quality Circles
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Course
    • Example for a Library Instruction Program
    • What to Do with Results
  • RSQC2: Recall, Summarize, Question, Connect, and Comment
    • When to Use RSQC2
    • Example RSQC2 for a Library Instruction Program
    • Example in a Credit-Bearing Library Course
    • How to Score RSQC2
    • What to Do with Results
  • Notes

Conclusion

  • Transparency
  • Collaboration
  • Evidence-Based Practice


Appendices

Appendix 1: Learning Outcomes

  • What Is a Learning Outcome?
  • Why Use Learning Outcomes?
  • How to Write a Learning Outcome
  • Notes

Appendix 2: Rubrics

  • What Is a Rubric?
  • Why Use Rubrics?
  • How to Create a Rubric
  • Notes
  • Suggested Reading
  • Assessment
  • Instructional Design
  • Library Instruction
  • Learning Theory
  • Standards

Melissa Bowles-Terry

Melissa Bowles-Terry is Head of Educational Initiatives at UNLV Libraries.

Cassandra Kvenild

Cassandra Kvenild is Distance Learning Librarian and Kaijsa Calkins is English Reference and Instruction Librarian at the University of Wyoming. Both are graduates of the University of Washington iSchool. They have written and presented about their embedded projects at national and international conferences, and are planning a second book on embedded librarianship. Cass's other research interests include assessment of library services to distance learners and technological innovations in online library services. Kaijsa's other research focuses on college student reading, with additional interest in information literacy learning and assessment, and social media in learning.

"The structure is easy to follow and may make incorporating these techniques into practice less intimidating for librarians."
— Journal of Academic Librarianship