Bridging Worlds: Emerging Models and Practices of U.S. Academic Libraries Around the Globe

Find on LibraryThing.Find on WorldCat.
$50.00
ALA Member: 
$ 45.00
Item Number: 
978-0-8389-8842-8
Published: 
2016
Publisher: 
ACRL
Pages: 
210
Width: 
6"
Height: 
9"
Format: 
Softcover
AP Categories: 
I, P
  • Description
  • Table of Contents
  • About the Authors
  • Reviews

Over the past decade, a growing number of American colleges and universities have made international engagement a key facet of their missions, emphasizing global awareness, interconnectedness, and student and community diversity. Universities are establishing campuses, branches, and enhanced programs outside of the United States, and many are partnering with foreign institutions in the Middle East and East Asia to introduce and integrate Western higher education into these regions. These collaborations seek to take advantage of the blending of cultural, social, political, and economic communities, and to chart new territories in research, teaching, and learning.
    
Academic libraries are playing a key role in many of these undertakings, acting as partners in the development of campus community, student life, and research. Bridging Worlds: Emerging Models and Practices of U.S. Academic Libraries Around the Globe presents examples of libraries working to play their part in campus development and international engagement. This book provides practical best practices, lessons learned, and perspectives gained, from collection building to finances to designing spaces, and touches on some of the cultural, political, and social factors at play as institutions work to support these complex organizations.

This book is also available as an Open Access Edition.

Acknowledgments
Introduction

Raymond Pun, Scott Collard, and Justin Parrott

 

Section 1: Designing and Envisioning the Library Ahead


chapter one. Envisioning the New Global Campus Library: A Conversation
Lucinda Covert-Vail and Roddy Austin
As interviewed by Scott Collard

 

Section 2: Delivering Global Access Services and Technology Support


chapter two. Creating Global Delivery Strategy: Services, Systems, and Practices
Beth Daniel Lindsay, Kristina Rose, Sydney Thompson, and Shoshannah Turgel

chapter three. Taking Interlibrary Loan Abroad
Beth E. Clausen

chapter four. Integrating Academic Technology Services into the Global Network University Library: Six Questions for the Team
Beth Russell, Ron Berry, and Brian Lewis

 

Section 3: Building Collections Abroad Collaboratively


chapter five. Licensing Electronic Resources in the Global Environment: A Conversation
Angela Carreño and Bill Maltarich
As interviewed by Scott Collard

chapter six. Collection Development for Global Campus Libraries
Ree DeDonato and Michael Hughes

chapter seven. Participatory Archives: Building on Traditions of Collaboration, Openness, and Accessibility at the American University in Cairo
Stephen Urgola and Carolyn Runyon

chapter eight. Creating Special Collections: A Case Study from NYU Abu Dhabi
Virginia Danielson and Michael Stoller

chapter nine. Managing Copyright in the International Campus Library
April M. Hathcock

 

Section 4: Developing Reference and Research Services on International Campuses


chapter ten. Reference and Research Services in a Global Campus Environment
Scott Collard, Ilka Datig, and Amani Magid

chapter eleven. Library Instruction Programs at American-Style Academic Libraries Outside of the United States
Amanda B. Click and Meggan Houlihan

chapter twelve. Supporting Library User Needs in an Expanding Global Network
Paula Feid and Daniel Perkins

 

 

 

Section 5: Providing Technical Services in a Global Context


chapter thirteen. Developing a Global Integration Strategy for Resource Acquisitions
Nina Servizzi

chapter fourteen. Global Strategy for Technical Services
Justin Parrott, Wenchao P Jia, and Heng (Helen) Ge

chapter fifteen. Resource Description and Access: Internationalizing, Teaching, and Learning RDA Cataloging Abroad
Sheau-yueh J. Chao

 

 

Raymond Pun

Raymond Pun is the first year student success librarian at California State University in Fresno. Previously, he was a reference and research services librarian at New York University Shanghai. He has presented widely at conferences such as ALA, SLA, IFLA, and the American Historical Association. His work has appeared in many publications, including The Huffington Post, Library Hi Tech, Reference Services Review, and Library Trends. His professional and research interests include gamification and emerging technologies in libraries, community engagement, data management, and digital scholarship services.

Scott Collard

Scott Collardis Head of Specialized Research Services and Social Sciences at New York University Division of Libraries. Scott received his MSLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MA in General Studies in the Humanities (Early American History and Literature) from The University of Chicago. His research interests focus on the development of research services in academic libraries.

Justin Parrott

Justin Parrott has been Technical Services and Research Librarian at New York University Abu Dhabi since December 2012. He received his MLIS from Kent State University. He currently manages the local technical services unit for NYU Abu Dhabi Library and is liaison to the university's Mathematics, Arabic, and Chinese language departments.

”In this increasingly international era, academic libraries, particularly those with programs in library and information science, will certainly benefit from this volume."
— American Reference Books Annual

”[T]here’s a wealth of valuable information and ideas here in an accessible, concise format. Recommended for academic librarians and information professionals."
— Library Journal

”Each chapter provides fresh ideas, experimental models, and new approaches to developing an international campus library in collaboration with the home campus. This easy-to-read guide provides valuable advice, models, and approaches for effective partnerships with international branch campus libraries."
— Reference & User Services Quarterly