Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses--eEditions e-book

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$34.00
ALA Member: 
$ 30.60
Item Number: 
8400-5588
Published: 
2011
Publisher: 
ACRL
Pages: 
288
Format: 
eBook
  • Description
  • Table of Contents
  • About the Author

Acknowledgements

Preface
Christopher V. Hollister—University at Buffalo

History and Evolution of Credit IL Courses in Higher Education
Sara Holder—McGill University

Creating the Credit IL Course in a University Setting
Catherine Cardwell and Colleen Boff—Bowling Green State University

Nemawashi: Integrating the Credit Information Literacy Course into a Community College Curriculum
Charles Keyes and Elizabeth S. Namei—LaGuardia Community College

Administrative Support for Librarians Teaching For-Credit Information Literacy
Rosalind Tedford and Lauren Pressley—Wake Forest University

Integrating the Credit Information Literacy Course into a Learning Community
Catherine Johnson, Thomas Arendall, Michael Shochet, and April Duncan—University of Baltimore

Creating a Combination IL and English Composition Course in a College Setting
Julie Roberson and Jenny Horton—King College

Developing an Online Credit IL Course for a Freshman Writing Program in a University Setting
Yvonne Mery, Rebecca Blakiston, Elizabeth Kline, Leslie Sult, and Michael M. Brewer—University of Arizona

Creating a Credit IL Course for Science Students
Margeaux Johnson and Sara Russell Gonzalez—University of Florida

Providing a Credit Information Literacy Course for an Engineering School
Diana Wheeler, Lia Vellardita, and Amy Kindschi—University of Wisconsin, Madison

Creating Required Credit IL Courses for Criminal Justice and Speech-Language Pathology Programs
Lyda F. Ellis and Stephanie Wiegand—University of Northern Colorado

Creating an Online, Discipline-Specific Credit IL Course for Graduate Students
Carolyn Meier—Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Using a Strategic Approach to Build Coherence and Relevance in Credit Information Literacy Courses
William Badke—Trinity Western University

Integrating Current Media Sources to Improve Student Interest in the Credit IL Course
Sarah Steiner and M. Leslie Madden—Georgia State University

Incorporating Emerging Technologies into a First Year Experience Credit IL Course
Anne Behler, Daniel C. Mack, and Emily Rimland—Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Leveraging Internet Communication Tools and an Audience Response System in a Credit IL Course
Christina Hoffman Gola—University of Houston

Using Video Gaming and Videoconferencing in a Credit IL Course
Karen Munro and Annie Zeidman-Karpinski—University of Oregon

Using Collaborative Learning in a Credit IL Course
Bonnie Imler—Pennsylvania State University, Altoona

The Motivation Triangle: Affecting Change in Student Learning in Credit IL Courses by Examining the Student, the Course Content, and the Teacher
Nancy Wootton Colborn—Indiana University South Bend

Using Constructivism to Engage Students in an Online Credit IL Course
Penny Bealle—Suffolk County Community College

Assessing Student Learning in a Credit IL Course
Tiffany R. Walsh—University at Buffalo

Contributors

Acknowledgements

Preface
Christopher V. Hollister—University at Buffalo

History and Evolution of Credit IL Courses in Higher Education
Sara Holder—McGill University

Creating the Credit IL Course in a University Setting
Catherine Cardwell and Colleen Boff—Bowling Green State University

Nemawashi: Integrating the Credit Information Literacy Course into a Community College Curriculum
Charles Keyes and Elizabeth S. Namei—LaGuardia Community College

Administrative Support for Librarians Teaching For-Credit Information Literacy
Rosalind Tedford and Lauren Pressley—Wake Forest University

Integrating the Credit Information Literacy Course into a Learning Community
Catherine Johnson, Thomas Arendall, Michael Shochet, and April Duncan—University of Baltimore

Creating a Combination IL and English Composition Course in a College Setting
Julie Roberson and Jenny Horton—King College

Developing an Online Credit IL Course for a Freshman Writing Program in a University Setting
Yvonne Mery, Rebecca Blakiston, Elizabeth Kline, Leslie Sult, and Michael M. Brewer—University of Arizona

Creating a Credit IL Course for Science Students
Margeaux Johnson and Sara Russell Gonzalez—University of Florida

Providing a Credit Information Literacy Course for an Engineering School
Diana Wheeler, Lia Vellardita, and Amy Kindschi—University of Wisconsin, Madison

Creating Required Credit IL Courses for Criminal Justice and Speech-Language Pathology Programs
Lyda F. Ellis and Stephanie Wiegand—University of Northern Colorado

Creating an Online, Discipline-Specific Credit IL Course for Graduate Students
Carolyn Meier—Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Using a Strategic Approach to Build Coherence and Relevance in Credit Information Literacy Courses
William Badke—Trinity Western University

Integrating Current Media Sources to Improve Student Interest in the Credit IL Course
Sarah Steiner and M. Leslie Madden—Georgia State University

Incorporating Emerging Technologies into a First Year Experience Credit IL Course
Anne Behler, Daniel C. Mack, and Emily Rimland—Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Leveraging Internet Communication Tools and an Audience Response System in a Credit IL Course
Christina Hoffman Gola—University of Houston

Using Video Gaming and Videoconferencing in a Credit IL Course
Karen Munro and Annie Zeidman-Karpinski—University of Oregon

Using Collaborative Learning in a Credit IL Course
Bonnie Imler—Pennsylvania State University, Altoona

The Motivation Triangle: Affecting Change in Student Learning in Credit IL Courses by Examining the Student, the Course Content, and the Teacher
Nancy Wootton Colborn—Indiana University South Bend

Using Constructivism to Engage Students in an Online Credit IL Course
Penny Bealle—Suffolk County Community College

Assessing Student Learning in a Credit IL Course
Tiffany R. Walsh—University at Buffalo

Contributors

Christopher V. Hollister

Christopher V. Hollister is an Associate Librarian with the University at Buffalo Libraries, where he is currently liaison to the Graduate School of Education, chair of the Information Literacy Task Force, and coordinator for the credit-bearing IL course, Library Research Methods. Chris is also an adjunct instructor for the University's Department of Library and Information Studies, and he created and regularly teaches the undergraduate level credit course, Introduction to Birding. Chris is co-founder and co-editor of the open access journal, Communications in Information Literacy, which was awarded the Special Certificate of Recognition and Appreciation by the ACRL Instruction Section in 2009.