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A History of ALA Policy on Intellectual Freedom: A Supplement to the Intellectual Freedom Manual, Ninth Edition—print/e-book Bundle
Trina Magi, Editor, and Martin Garnar, Assistant Editor, for Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF)
Item Number: 7700-3253
 
Publisher: ALA Editions
Price: $99.00
 
 
 
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172 pages
Year Published: 2015

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Collecting several key documents and policy statements, this supplement to the ninth edition of the Intellectual Freedom Manual traces a history of ALA’s commitment to fighting censorship. An introductory essay by Judith Krug and Candace Morgan, updated by OIF Director Barbara Jones, sketches out an overview of ALA policy on intellectual freedom. An important resource, this volume includes documents which discuss such foundational issues as
  • The Library Bill of Rights
  • Protecting the freedom to read
  • ALA’s Code of Ethics
  • How to respond to challenges and concerns about library resources
  • Minors and internet activity
  • Meeting rooms, bulletin boards, and exhibits
  • Copyright
  • Privacy, including the retention of library usage records

Table of Contents

Introduction and User’s Guide

Part I:    Intellectual Freedom and Libraries

1.    ALA and Intellectual Freedom: A Historical Overview
Judith F. Krug and Candace D. Morgan; updated by Barbara M. Jones

Part II: Essays on the History of Core Intellectual Freedom Documents

2.    Library Bill of Rights
3.    Code of Ethics of the American Library Association
4.    The Freedom to Read
5.    Libraries: An American Value

Part III: Essays on the History of Interpretations, Guidelines, and Other Statements

6.    Interpretations of the Library Bill of Rights and Code of Ethics of the American Library Association
7.    Access to Digital Information, Services, and Networks—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
8.    Access to Library Resources and Services for Minors—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
9.    Access to Library Resources and Services Regardless of Sex, Gender Identity, Gender Expression, or Sexual Orientation—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
10.    Access to Resources and Services in the School Library—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
11.    Advocating for Intellectual Freedom—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
12.    Challenged Resources—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
13.    Copyright—An Interpretation of the Code of Ethics
14.    Creating Policy for Your Library—User Behavior and Library Use (officially titled “Guidelines for the Development of Policies and Procedures regarding User Behavior and Library Usage”)
15.    Diversity in Collection Development—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
16.    Economic Barriers to Information Access—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
17.    Evaluating Library Collections—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
18.    Exhibit Spaces and Bulletin Boards—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
19.    Expurgation of Library Resources—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
20.    Guidelines for the Development and Implementation of Policies, Regulations, and Procedures Affecting Access to Library Resources, Services, and Facilities
21.    How to Respond to Challenges and Concerns about Library Resources
22.    Intellectual Freedom Principles for Academic Libraries—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
23.    Labeling and Rating Systems—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
24.    Library-Initiated Programs as a Resource—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
25.    Meeting Rooms—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
26.    Minors and Internet Activity—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Right
27.    Policy on Governmental Intimidation
28.    Prisoners’ Right to Read—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
29.    Privacy—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
30.    Resolution on the Retention of Library Usage Records
31.    Resolution on Workplace Speech
32.    Restricted Access to Library Materials—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
33.    RFID in Libraries—Privacy and Confidentiality Guidelines
34.    Services to Persons with Disabilities—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
35.    The Universal Right to Free Expression—An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights

Index to Essays
Index

About the Editors

Trina Magi is a library professor and reference and instruction librarian at the University of Vermont. She has chaired state and regional intellectual freedom committees, served on the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee, and published a number of articles on privacy. She has won several awards for her intellectual freedom advocacy.

Martin Garnar is the reference services librarian and professor of library science at Regis University in Denver, CO. He also teaches professional ethics, library instruction, and foundations of library and information science for the University of Denver’s library and information science program. He has served as chair of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee and the Committee on Professional Ethics.

ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) is charged with implementing the intellectual freedom policies of the American Library Association through educating librarians and the public about the concept of intellectual freedom as embodied in the Library Bill of Rights, the Association’s basic policy on free access to libraries and library materials. In order to meet its educational goals, the Office undertakes information, support, and coordination activities.
 
 

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Intellectual Freedom Manual, Ninth Edition
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